Feb 21, 2020  
2019 - 2020 Cowley College Academic Catalog 
    
2019 - 2020 Cowley College Academic Catalog

PHS4551 GENERAL PHYSICS II COURSE PROCEDURE


PHS 4551 GENERAL PHYSICS II

5 Credit Hours

Student Level:

This course is open to students on the college level in either the freshman or sophomore year.

Catalog Description:

PHS4551 - GENERAL PHYSICS II (N) (5 hrs.)

[KRSN PHY2020/2021/2022]

A continuation of PHS4550 General Physics I. Topics include electricity and magnetism-electric field, electric potential, current electric power, magnetic field, and induction; optics-nature of light and wave optics; modern physics-special relativity, atomic structure, quantum mechanics and radioactivity.

Course Classification: Lecture / Lab

Prerequisite:  

PHS4550 General Physics I.

Course Objectives:            

To provide a thorough study of the mechanical and thermodynamic universe by theoretical derivation and practical applications in problem solving, laboratory study, and demonstration.

Learner Outcomes:            

The learning outcomes and competencies detailed in this course outline or syllabus meet or exceed the learning outcomes and competencies specified by the Kansas Core Outcomes Groups project for this course as approved by the Kansas Board of Regents.

Units Outcomes and Criterion Based Evaluation Key for Core Content:

The following defines the minimum core content not including the final examination period. Instructors may add other content as time allows.

UNIT 1 CHAPTER 15: CHARGES & ELECTRICAL FIELDS

Outcomes: The student will acquire an understanding of the properties of charges and electrical fields.

  • Illustrate and describe the attractive and repulsive electrical forces.
  • Describe insulators and conductors.
  • Solve applications of Coulomb’s Law.
  • Solve applications with the Principle of Superposition.
  • Analyze the forces between two or more point charges in electric fields.
  • Describe electrical field lines and illustrate by example.

UNIT 1 CHAPTER 16:        ELECTRICAL ENERGY & CAPACITANCE

Outcomes: The student will acquire knowledge and understanding of electrical energy and capacitance.              

  • Solve the potential of an electrical field.
  • Evaluate the potential difference expression for the change in potential and velocity of charged particles.
  • Calculate the electrical potential due to point charges.
  • Determine the work in moving point charges in a potential gradient.
  • Solve expressions for capacitance in applications.
  • Determine the charge of capacitor surfaces.
  • Analyze series and parallel capacitive circuits.
  • Determine the energy in capacitive circuits.

UNIT 1 CHAPTER 17:  ELECTRICAL CURRENT AND RESISTANCE

Outcomes: The student will acquire knowledge and understanding of Electrical Current and Resistance.

  • Interpret the expression the expression for current based on quantity of charge.
  • Apply the drift-velocity concept to applications of conductors.
  • Propose expressions for variables given Ohm’s law expressions.
  • Solve applications of Ohm’s law in circuits.
  • Determine the resistance and resistivity of components at various temperatures.
  • Solve applications of power in circuits.

UNIT 2 CHAPTER 18: DIRECT CURRENT CIRCUITS

Outcomes: The student will acquire knowledge and understanding of Direct Current Circuits

  • Determine expressions for series and parallel resistance circuits.
  • Solve expressions for resistance and current in direct current circuits.
  • Solve applications of direct resistive circuits utilizing Kirchoff’s Law.
  • Employ properties of circuits to solve applications of RC Circuits.
  • Utilize the Wheatstone bridge concept to solve resistance-measuring applications.

UNIT 2 CHAPTER 19: MAGNETISM

Outcomes: The student will acquire knowledge and comprehension of magnetism and the applications to circuits and measurement

  • Determine an expressions for the parameters of magnetic fields.
  • Evaluate magnetic field parameters in applications.
  • Solve applications utilizing torque in a loop of current carrying wire.
  • Calculate the motion and charge of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields.
  • Determine the forces on parallel current carrying conductors.
  • Apply Ampere’s Law to magnetic fields of conductors.

UNIT 2 CHAPTER 20: INDUCED VOLTAGE AND INDUCTANCE

Outcomes: The student will gain knowledge and understanding of Induced Electrical Fields and applications to Generators and Circuits

  • Express the relationship between magnetic flux and induced current.
  • Define Faraday’s Law of induction.
  • Calculate the magnitude of a motional EMF.
  • Evaluate Faraday’s law for current, magnetic flux, or motion of a conductor.
  • Apply Lenz’s and Farady’s Laws to coils and generators.
  • Evaluate circuits for self-inductance.
  • Determine the time constants, resistance, and inductance in circuits.
  • Calculate the energy stored in a magnetic field.

UNIT 3 CHAPTER 21: ALTERNATING CURRENT CIRCUITS AND ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES

Outcomes: The student will gain knowledge and understanding of Alternating Current Circuits and Electromagnetic Spectrum Wave Phenomena

  • Determine the RMS values for current and voltage.
  • Evaluate phase relationship dependent variables in capacitive, inductive and resistive circuits.
  • Find the phase angle from the impedance statement for any circuit.
  • Determine the resonance frequency or capacitance of a series RLC circuit.
  • Calculate the step up and step down ratio=s for transformers.
  • Recall the electromagnetic spectrum.
  • Relate the properties of a moving charged particle in a conductor and an antenna.
  • Determine an expression for the velocity of electromagnetic radiation for the magnetic and electric field magnitude.
  • Calculate the average power for various surfaces absorbing radiation.
  • Describe the properties of amplitude and frequency modulated radiation.
  • Solve applications for the properties of electromagnetic radiation.

UNIT 3 CHAPTER 22:  THE NATURE OF LIGHT

Outcomes: The student will acquire knowledge and understanding of the nature of light and the properties of reflection and refraction of light

  • Solve the expression for the energy of a photon.
  • Describe the experimental determination of the velocity of light by Roemer and Fizeau.
  • Solve applications of photon velocity in substances with an index of refraction.
  • Calculate the relationships of reflected and refracted light with Snell’s Law.
  • Determine the properties of refracted light from prisms.
  • Evaluate the total internal reflection of light with Snell’s Law.

UNIT 3 CHAPTER 23: MIRRORS AND LENSES

Outcomes: The student will acquire knowledge and understanding of applications of reflected and refracted light to mirror and lens systems

  • Evaluate the properties of spherical and plane mirrors.
  • Evaluate the properties of convex mirrors and their sign conventions.
  • Determine the position, orientation, and magnitude of images produced by convex and concave mirrors.
  • Determine the properties of images formed by refraction of light in then lenses.

UNIT 4 CHAPTER 24:  OPTICAL WAVE PROPERTIES

Outcomes: The student will acquire knowledge and understanding of the optical wave properties

  • Express knowledge of necessary conditions for interference.
  • Solve applications of Single and double Interference.
  • Evaluate the expressions for double slit interference.
  • Measure the wavelength of the light source by interference.
  • Evaluate interference in thin films.
  • Evaluate expressions for single and double slit diffraction in applications.
  • Define polarization.
  • Evaluate polarization angles from expressions of Brewster’s Law.
  • Describe polarization by scattering, double refraction, and reflection.

UNIT 4 CHAPTER 27:  QUANTUM MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATTER AND RADIATION

Outcomes: The student will acquire knowledge and understanding of quantum mechanical properties of matter and radiation.

  • Solve applications of quantized energy with Planck’s Hypothesis.
  • Determine the expression and evaluate for applications of the photoelectric effect.
  • Apply x-ray diffraction to atomic structure applications.
  • Determine the momentum of photons by Comptom Scattering.
  • Solve applications for DeBroglie waves to matter.
  • Determine the uncertainty in a measurement application.

UNIT 4 CHAPTER 28:  THE EARLY AND MODERN ATOMIC THEORY

Outcomes: The student will acquire knowledge and understanding of the early and modern atomic theory

  • Determine the wavelength and location of various line series in the spectrum of hydrogen.
  • Evaluate expressions for the atomic spectra in applications.
  • Evaluate the properties of the hydrogen atom with Bohr’s atomic model.
  • Determine the energy and radial changes in hydrogen with the modified Bohr model.
  • Determine the electronic structure of atoms with quantum numbers.

UNIT 4 CHAPTER 29:  THE PROPERTIES OF NUCLEAR PARTICLES

Outcomes: The student will acquire knowledge and understanding of the properties of nuclear particles and their decay processes

  • Describe or calculate the radius of density of nuclear particles.
  • Determine the binding energy of nuclear particles.
  • Describe the rules of nuclear stability and analyze examples for stability.
  • Evaluate various nuclides for decay rate and decay constants.
  • Determine the number of nuclear particles remaining after decay intervals.
  • Illustrate alpha, beta, and gamma decay sequences in examples.
  • Determine the Q value for energies in specific nuclear reactions.

Projects Required:  

None 

Text Book:    

Contact the Bookstore for current textbook.

References:              

CRC Handbook of Chemistry & Physics

Materials/Equip:      

IBM microcomputer with interface software, Data Analysis software, Air Track with electronic and optic time gates; projectile, rotational, and gravitational motion equipment.

Attendance Policy:   

Students should adhere to the attendance policy outlined by the instructor in the course syllabus.

Grading Policy:  

The grading policy will be outlined by the instructor in the course syllabus.

Maximum class size:  

Based on classroom occupancy

Course Timeframe: 

The U.S. Department of Education, Higher Learning Commission and the Kansas Board of Regents define credit hour and have specific regulations that the college must follow when developing, teaching and assessing the educational aspects of the college. A credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally-established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester hour of credit or an equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time. The number of semester hours of credit allowed for each distance education or blended hybrid courses shall be assigned by the college based on the amount of time needed to achieve the same course outcomes in a purely face-to-face format.

Refer to the following policies:

402.00 Academic Code of Conduct

263.00 Student Appeal of Course Grades

403.00 Student Code of Conduct

Disability Services Program:  

Cowley College, in recognition of state and federal laws, will accommodate a student with a documented disability.  If a student has a disability, which may impact work in this class, which requires accommodations, contact the Disability Services Coordinator.