Aug 13, 2020  
2019 - 2020 Cowley College Academic Catalog 
    
2019 - 2020 Cowley College Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

CIS1893 DATABASE FUNDAMENTALS COURSE PROCEDURE


CIS1893 DATABASE FUNDAMENTALS 

3 Credit Hours

Student Level:  

This course is open to students on the college level in either the freshman or sophomore year.

Catalog Description:

CIS1893 - Database Fundamentals (3 hrs.)

This course gives students the design tools necessary to create effective and efficient databases.  Both logical and physical design is covered.  Various database management systems are studied.  Students will also learn basic SQL. Prerequisite: Basic Computer Skills.

Course Classification:

Lecture

Prerequisites: 

Basic Computer Skills

Controlling Purpose:

This course is designed to help the student increase their knowledge concerning various database systems including logical and physical design.  Students will also learn basic SQL.

Learner Outcomes:

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to use a database management system (DBMS) to solve business problems.  Students will study data design.  Students will develop a general knowledge of database design, development, and administration.  Students will learn how to develop a database including tables, queries, forms, and reports.  Students will learn how to develop database applications.

Unit Outcomes for Criterion Based Evaluation:

The following defines the minimum core content not including the final examination period. Instructors may add other content as time allows.

UNIT 1: Database Systems

Outcomes:  After completion of this unit, the student will have a working knowledge of the basic concepts of databases, history of databases, main components and functions of database systems.

  • Explain difference between data and information
  • Explain the importance of database design
  • Explain the role, advantages, and types of databases
  • Explain history of file system data processing
  • Explain problems with file system data processing
  • Explain database systems including environment, functions, and management

UNIT 2: Data Models

Outcomes:  After completion of this unit, the student will have a working knowledge of data modeling concepts, the history of data models, and tools to model data.

  • Explain data modeling and data models
  • Explain the importance of data models
  • List and explain the basic building blocks of data models
  • Explain how business rules evolve into data model components
  • List and explain various data models including hierarchical, relational, entity relationship, object-oriented, object/relational, and XML 
  • List and explain the degrees of data abstraction including external, conceptual, internal, and physical model

UNIT 3: The Relational Database Model

Outcomes:  After completion of this unit, the student will have a working knowledge of the relational model’s logical structure, how to design a relational database, tables, and design considerations.

  • Explain the logical view of data
  • Explain the role of keys
  • Explain integrity rules
  • List and explain relational set operators
  • Explain the role of the data dictionary and the system catalog
  • List and explain the 1:M, 1:1, M:N relationships
  • Explain data redundancy 
  • Explain the role of indexes
  • List and explain Codd’s relational database rules
  • Design a database/tables using keys, relationships, avoiding data redundancy, and indexes.

UNIT 4: Entity Relationship Modeling

Outcomes:  After completion of this unit, the student will have a working knowledge of the main characteristics of entity relationship components, how entities are defined, refined and incorporated into the database design process, and how components affect database design and implementation.

  • List and explain all the entities in the entity relationship model (ERM)
  •  Develop an entity relationship diagram
  • Explain database design challenges

UNIT 5: Advanced Data Modeling

Outcomes:  After completion of this unit, the student will have a working knowledge of the extended entity relationship model, entity clustering, and entity clustering and primary keys.

  • Explain the extended entity relationship model
  • Explain entity clustering
  • Explain entity integrity and the use of primary keys

UNIT 6: Normalization of Database Tables

Outcomes:  After completion of this unit, the student will have a working knowledge of normalization, normal forms, transformations from lower to higher normal forms, and denormalization.

  • Explain database tables and normalization
  • Explain the need for normalization
  • List and explain the normalization process
  • Explain surrogate key considerations
  • Explain higher-level normal forms
  • Explain normalization and database design
  • Explain denormalization
  • Redesign existing tables for normalization
  • Design a new database/tables with normalization

UNIT 7: Introduction to Structured Query Language

Outcomes:  After completion of this unit, the student will have a working knowledge of the basic commands and functions of SQL along with some data administration, manipulation, and querying techniques. 

  • Explain the role of SQL
  • Create a database and tables
  • Add constraints and indexes
  • Add, update, delete, and list table rows
  • Insert table rows with a SELECT subquery
  • Create SELECT queries using conditional restrictions, arithmetic operators, logical operators, special operators, ordering, unique values, aggregate functions, and grouping
  • Create data definition commands
  • Create views
  • Join database tables

UNIT 8: Advanced SQL

Outcomes:  After completion of this unit, the student will have a working knowledge of relational set operators, advanced SQL join, subqueries, correlated queries, SQL functions, sequences, views, procedural SQL, and embedded SQL.

  • Use relational set operators
  • Use SQL join operators
  • Use subqueries and correlated queries
  • Use sql functions
  • Use Oracle sequences
  • Create updatable views
  • Create procedural SQL
  • Create embedded SQL

UNIT 9: Database Design

Outcomes:  After completion of this unit, the student will have a working knowledge of database design techniques, database design strategies and how to use the life cycles in design.

  • Explain the system design life cycle (SDLC)
  • Explain the database life cycle (DBLC)
  • Explain conceptual design
  • List and explain criteria for DBMS selection
  • Explain logical design
  • Explain physical design
  • Explain database design strategies
  • Explain centralized vs. decentralized design

UNIT 10: Transaction Management and Concurrency Control

Outcomes:  After completion of this unit, the student will have a working knowledge of database transactions and concurrency.

  • Explain what is a transaction
  • Explain concurrency control
  • Explain concurrency control with locking methods
  • Explain concurrency control with time stamping methods
  • Explain concurrency control with optimistic methods
  • Explain database recovery management

UNIT 11: Database Performance-Tuning and Query Optimization

Outcomes:  After completion of this unit, the student will have a working knowledge of how to optimize queries and DBMSs.

  • Explain database performance-tuning concepts
  • Explain query processing
  • Explain optimizer choices
  • Explain SQL performance tuning
  • Performance-tune some query(s)
  • Use indexes to improve a query
  • Explain query formulation
  • Explain DBMS performance tuning

UNIT 12: Distributed Database Management Systems

Outcomes:  After completion of this unit, the student will have a working knowledge of distributed database management systems including transaction management and database design considerations.  

  • Explain the history of distributed database management systems
  • List and explain DDBMS advantage and disadvantages
  • Explain distributed processing and distributed databases
  • List and explain the characteristics of DDBMS
  • List and explain the components of DDBMS
  • List and explain the levels of data and process distribution
  • Explain distributed database transparency features
  • Explain distribution transparency
  • Explain transaction transparency
  • Explain performance transparency and query optimization
  • Explain distributed database design
  • Explain Client/Server vs. DDBMS

UNIT 14: Database Connectivity and Web Technologies

Outcomes:  After completion of this unit, the student will have a working knowledge of various database connectivity technologies, web browser plug-ins, SQL data services and how XML is used in web database development.

  • Explain database connectivity
  • Explain internet databases
  • Explain the basics of XML
  • Create simple XML
  • Explain SQL data services

UNIT 15: Database Administration and Security

Outcomes:  After completion of this unit, the student will have a working knowledge of the DBA’s roles, security considerations, data dictionary usage, and CASE tools.  

  • Explain the need for and the role of a database in a corporation
  • Explain the DBA’s managerial and technical role
  • Explain how security needs to be implemented: security policies, security vulnerabilities, and database security
  • Use a data dictionary
  • Use a CASE tool

Projects Required:

Various database projects

Textbook:

Contact Bookstore for current textbook.

Materials/Equipment Required:

None

Attendance Policy:

Students should adhere to the attendance policy outlined by the instructor in the course syllabus.

Grading Policy:

The grading policy will be outlined by the instructor in the course syllabus.

Maximum class size:

Based on classroom occupancy

Course Timeframe: 

The U.S. Department of Education, Higher Learning Commission and the Kansas Board of Regents define credit hour and have specific regulations that the college must follow when developing, teaching and assessing the educational aspects of the college. A credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally-established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester hour of credit or an equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time. The number of semester hours of credit allowed for each distance education or blended hybrid courses shall be assigned by the college based on the amount of time needed to achieve the same course outcomes in a purely face-to-face format.

Refer to the following policies:

402.00 Academic Code of Conduct

263.00 Student Appeal of Course Grades

403.00 Student Code of Conduct

Disability Services Program:

Cowley College, in recognition of state and federal laws, will accommodate a student with a documented disability.  If a student has a disability, which may impact work in this class, which requires accommodations, contact the Disability Services Coordinator