Feb 25, 2020  
2019 - 2020 Cowley College Academic Catalog 
    
2019 - 2020 Cowley College Academic Catalog

CIS1894 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL DESIGN COURSE PROCEDURE


CIS1894 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL DESIGN  

4 Credit Hours

Student Level:  

This course is open to students on the college level in either the Freshman or Sophomore year.

Catalog Description:

CIS1894 - Introduction to Digital Design (4 hrs.)

This course will introduce students to various concepts in digital design.  These topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, logic gates, gate-level minimization, combinational logic, synchronous sequential logic, registers and counters.  The course consists of 3 classroom credit hours with 1 lab credit hour.

Course Classification:

Lecture/Lab

Prerequisites:

MTH4420 College Algebra or any math course above MTH4420.

Controlling Purpose:

This course is designed to provide an introduction to digital design.  These concepts provide a foundation for future studies in courses related to engineering and computer engineering.

Learner Outcomes:

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to demonstrate various methods of representing numbers in different systems, demonstrate various digital logic gates used in digital circuit design, find a minimal gate-level implementation of Boolean functions for a digital circuit, design and analyze circuits using combinational logic, design and analyze sequential circuits using combinational circuits and various memory elements, and design shift registers and counters.

Unit Outcomes for Criterion Based Evaluation:

The following outline defines the minimum core content not including the final examination period.  Instructors may add other material as time allows.

UNIT 1: Digital Systems and Binary Numbers

Outcomes:  Demonstrate various methods of representing numbers in different systems

  • Explain the binary number system
  • Convert between binary, octal, decimal, and hexadecimal numbers
  • Take the complement and reduced radix complement of a number
  • Form the code of a number
  • Form the parity bit of a word

UNIT 2: Boolean Algebra and Logic Gates

Outcomes: Demonstrate various digital logic gates used in digital circuit design

  • Explain the basics of postulates used to form algebraic structures
  • Explain the Huntington Postulates
  • Use the basic theorems and postulates of Boolean algebra
  • Develop a logic diagram from a Boolean function
  • Derive a Boolean function from a logic diagram
  • Apply DeMorgan’s theorems
  • Express a Boolean function as a truth table
  • Derive a Boolean function from a truth table
  • Express a Boolean function as a sum of minterms and as a product of maxterms
  • Convert from a sum of minterms to a product of maxterms, and vice versa
  • Form a two-level gate structure from a Boolean function in sum of products form; know how to form a  two-level gate structure from a Boolean function in product of sums form
  • Implement a Boolean function with NAND and inverter gates; know how to implement a Boolean function with NOR and inverter gates

UNIT 3: Gate-Level Minimization

Outcomes: Find a minimal gate-level implementation of Boolean functions for a digital circuit.

  • Derive and simplify a Karnaugh map for Boolean functions of 2, 3, and 4 variables
  • Drive the prime implicants of a Boolean function
  • Obtain the sum of products and the product of sums forms of a Boolean function directly from its Karnaugh map
  • Create the Karnaugh map of a Boolean function from its truth table
  • Use don’t care conditions to simplify a Karnaugh map
  • Form a two-level NAND and a two-level NOR implementation of a Boolean function
  • Declare a Verilog module or a VHDL entity-architecture for a combinational logic circuit
  • Write a structural model of the circuit for a given logic diagram using a) Verilog predefined primitives or b) user-defined VHDL components
  • Draw the waveform of an input signal to the unit under test given a test bench

UNIT 4: Combinational Logic

Outcomes: Design and Analyze Circuits Using Combinational Logic

  • Analyze a combinational logic circuit given its logic diagram
  • Explain the functionality of a half adder and a full-adder
  • Explain the concepts of overflow and underflow
  • Describe the implementation of a binary adder
  • Describe the implementation of a binary coded decimal (BCD) adder
  • Describe the implementation of a binary multiplier
  • Explain fundamental combinational logic circuits: decoder, encoder, priority encoder, multiplexer, and three-state gate
  • Implement a Boolean function with a multiplexer
  • Explain the distinction between gate-level, dataflow, and behavioral modeling with HDLs
  • Write a gate-level Verilog or VHDL model of a fundamental logic circuit
  • Write a hierarchical hardware description language (HDL) model of a combinational logic circuit
  • Write a dataflow model of a fundamental combinational logic circuit
  • Write a Verilog continuous assignment statement, or a VHDL signal assignment statement
  • Declare a Verilog procedural block, or a VHDL process
  • Write a simple test bench

UNIT 5: Synchronous Sequential Logic

Outcomes: Design and analyze sequential circuits using combinational circuits and various memory elements

  • Explain how to distinguish a sequential circuit from a combinational circuit
  • Explain the functionality of a SR latch, transparent latch, D flip-flop, JK flip-flop, and T flip-flop
  • Use the characteristic table and characteristic equation of a flip-flop
  • Derive the state equation, state table, and state diagram of a clocked sequential circuit
  • Explain the difference between Mealy and Moore finite state machines
  • Write a HDL model of the machine given the state diagram of a finite state machine
  • Explain the HDL models of latches and flip-flops
  • Write synthesizable HDL models of clocked sequential circuits
  • Explain how to design a state machine using manual methods
  • Explain how to eliminate equivalent states in a state table
  • Define a one-hot state assignment code
  • Design a sequential circuit with a) D flip-flops, b) JK flip-flops, and c) T flip-flops

UNIT 6: Registers and Counters

Outcomes: Design shift registers and counters

  • Explain the use, functionality, and modes of operation of registers, shift registers, and universal shift registers
  • Explain how to properly create the effect of a gated clock
  • Explain the structure and functionality of a serial adder circuit
  • Explain the behavior of a) ripple counter, b) synchronous counter, c) ring counter, and d) Johnson counter
  • Write structural and behavioral HDL models of registers, shift registers, universal shift registers, and counters.

Projects Required:

The lab portion of the class will consist of the following labs (at a minimum):

  1. Introduction to basic logic gates
  2. Usage of NAND and NOR as universal gate
  3. Implementing logic circuits using Boolean algebra concepts
  4. Reduction and verification of Boolean expressions
  5. Reducing SOP expressions using Karnaugh-Maps
  6. Design and analyze binary to gray code converter
  7. Design and analyze adders/subtractor using multism
  8. Implementation of logic function
  9. Verify the basic operation of D, JK and T FLIP FLOP
  10. Design and implementation of 4-bit synchronous binary up counter

Textbook:

Contact Bookstore for current textbook.

Materials/Equipment Required:

None

Attendance Policy:

Students should adhere to the attendance policy outlined by the instructor in the course syllabus.

Grading Policy:

The grading policy will be outlined by the instructor in the course syllabus.

Maximum class size:

Based on classroom occupancy

Course Time Frame:

The U.S. Department of Education, Higher Learning Commission and the Kansas Board of Regents define credit hour and have specific regulations that the college must follow when developing, teaching and assessing the educational aspects of the college.  A credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally-established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester hour of credit or an equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time.  The number of semester hours of credit allowed for each distance education or blended hybrid courses shall be assigned by the college based on the amount of time needed to achieve the same course outcomes in a purely face-to-face format.

Refer to the following policies:

402.00 Academic Code of Conduct

263.00 Student Appeal of Course Grades

403.00 Student Code of Conduct

Disability Services Program:

Cowley College, in recognition of state and federal laws, will accommodate a student with a documented disability.  If a student has a disability which may impact work in this class and which requires accommodations, contact the Disability Services Coordinator.