Feb 19, 2020  
2019 - 2020 Cowley College Academic Catalog 
    
2019 - 2020 Cowley College Academic Catalog

AGR1266 CROP & PLANT SCIENCE COURSE PROCEDURE


AGR1266 CROP & PLANT SCIENCE

4 Credit Hours

Student Level:

This course is open to students on the college level in either the freshman and sophomore year.

Catalog Description:

AGR1266 - Crop & Plant Science (4 hrs.)

This course looks at crops and forage plant and the science through history up to today. This course shows how crops fit into all of society and how crops and the by-products contribute to the wellbeing of humans and industries from a worldwide perspective. This course explores the agronomics of crops (including field, small grains, grasses and legumes) and the culture needs. The class also explores crop rotation, soil prep and fertilization, varieties, pests, harvesting and storage of the products. As well as the environmental factors, soils and pests and associated management practices. Lab will be used to insure knowledge of these practices. This course consists of lecture (3cr) and lab (1cr).

Course Classification:

Lecture/Lab

Prerequisites:

None

Controlling Purpose:

The purpose of this this course is to study crops and forage plant and the science through history up to today. This course shows how crops fit into all of society and how crops and the by-products contribute to the wellbeing of humans and industries from a worldwide perspective. This course explores the agronomics of crops (including field, small grains, grasses and legumes) and the culture needs. The class also explores crop rotation, soil prep and fertilization, varieties, pests, harvesting and storage of the products. As well as the environmental factors, soils and pests and associated management practices. Lab will be used to insure knowledge of these practices.

Learner Outcomes:

Upon completion of the course, the student will

  1. Summarize the evolution of agriculture through history and the role of sustainability in the future.
  2. Evaluate soil formation, land classification, and soil fertility.
  3. Analyze water irrigation and conservation practices.
  4. Analyze integrated pest management and insect control.
  5. Evaluate plant diseases and weed control.
  6. Classify the selection, cultural practices, harvesting, and storage of seven crop varieties (grain, sugar, oil, fiber, specialty, forage, veg/fruit/nut).

Unit Outcomes for Criterion Based Evaluation:

The following outline defines the minimum core content not including the final examination period. Instructors may add other material as time allows.

UNIT 1: Introduction and History

Outcomes: Upon completion of this unit, the students will be able to successfully summarize the evolution of agriculture through history and the role of sustainability in the future.

  • Describe what crop and plant science is.
  • Evaluate the value of main crops produced for mankind.
  • Describe the worldwide systems of agricultural production.
  • Discuss how production is effected in the world.
  • Describe the part of the role crops play in human nutrition.

UNIT 2: Soil and Land

Outcomes: Upon completion of this unit, the students will be able to successfully evaluate soil formation, land classification, and soil fertility.

  • Describe the physical and biological qualities of soil and its formation.
  • Describe land capabilities, capability factors, and capability classifications
  • Analyze the components of soil fertility
  • Demonstrate soil sampling and analysis
  • Illustrate how soil amendments are used with plants

UNIT 3: Conservation and Irrigation Practices

Outcomes: Upon completion of this unit, the students will be able to successfully analyze water irrigation and conservation practices.

  • Explain soil moisture management.
  • Describe quality irrigation water.
  • Evaluate sources of water.
  • Demonstrate methods of water application.
  • Demonstrate efficient use of water.
  • Demonstrate the use of chemicals in irrigation.

UNIT 4: Pest Management Practices

Outcomes: Upon completion of this unit, the students will be able to successfully analyze integrated pest management and insect control.

  • Explain the meaning and importance of agroecosystems.
  • Illustrate pest control tactics with Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
  • Demonstrate important safety practices with pesticides.
  • Distinguish between beneficial and harmful insects.
  • Describe scouting procedures and define economic thresholds.
  • Explain how insect and nematode control is monitored.

UNIT 5: Disease and Weed Prevention

Outcomes: Upon completion of this unit, the students will be able to successfully evaluate plant diseases and weed control.

  • Describe the types and causes of plant diseases.
  • Identify common plant diseases.
  • Describe the dispersal of plant diseases.
  • Discuss methods of plant disease control.
  • Explain weeds and losses caused by weeds.
  • Classify the types of weeds based on life cycle and growth.
  • Analyze ways weeds are spread.
  • Apply methods of weed control.
  • Explain herbicide selectivity.
  • Demonstrate herbicide applications

UNIT 6: Classification, Handling and Storage Practices

Outcomes: Upon completion of this unit, the students will be able to successfully classify the selection, cultural practices, harvesting, and storage of seven crop varieties (grain, sugar, oil, fiber, specialty, forage, veg/fruit/nut).

  • Recognize seven crop varieties (grain, sugar, oil, fiber, specialty, forage, veg/fruit/nut)
  • Classify crops according to production location.
  • Explain or demonstrate cultural practices of various crops.
  • Explain or demonstrate the selection of various crops.
  • Describe or illustrate the harvesting and storage techniques for various crops.

Projects Required:

Varies, refer to syllabus

Textbook:

Contact Bookstore for current textbook.

Attendance Policy:

Students should adhere to the attendance policy outlined by the instructor in the course syllabus.

Grading Policy:

The grading policy will be outlined by the instructor in the course syllabus.

Maximum class size:

Based on classroom occupancy.

Course Time Frame:

The U.S. Department of Education, Higher Learning Commission and the Kansas Board of Regents define credit hour and have specific regulations that the college must follow when developing, teaching and assessing the educational aspects of the college.  A credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally-established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester hour of credit or an equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time.  The number of semester hours of credit allowed for each distance education or blended hybrid courses shall be assigned by the college based on the amount of time needed to achieve the same course outcomes in a purely face-to-face format.

Refer to the following policies:

402.00 Academic Code of Conduct

263.00 Student Appeal of Course Grades

403.00 Student Code of Conduct

Disability Services Program: 

Cowley College, in recognition of state and federal laws, will accommodate a student with a documented disability.  If a student has a disability which may impact work in this class which requires accommodations, contact the Disability Services Coordinator.