Feb 21, 2020  
2019 - 2020 Cowley College Academic Catalog 
    
2019 - 2020 Cowley College Academic Catalog

BIO4148 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY COURSE PROCEDURE


BIO4148 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I  

4 Credit Hours

Student Level:

This course is open to students on the college level in either the freshman or sophomore year.

Catalog Description:
BIO 4148 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I (N) (4 hrs.)

This course represents the first of an eight (8) credit hour Anatomy and Physiology course and is designed to provide students with a thorough study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The student is expected to enroll in the second half of the course (BIO4149) during the same academic year, and both courses (BIO4148 and BIO4149) must be taken to be equivalent to BIO4150 Human Anatomy and Physiology. Lecture and lab studies will include: organization of the body; cells; tissues; membranes and glands; skeletal; muscular; nervous; sensory and endocrine systems.

Course Classifications: Lecture/Lab

Prerequisites:

The student must complete one of the following, BIO4111 Principles of Biology, BIO4110 Biology Review, or successful completion of a life science lab class within the past five years.

Controlling Purpose:

This course represents the first of an eight (8) credit hour anatomy and Physiology course and is designed to provide students with a thorough study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The student is expected to enroll in the second half of the course (BIO4149) during the same academic year, and both courses (BIO4148 and BIO4149) must be taken to be equivalent to BIO4150 Anatomy and Physiology. Lecture and lab studies will include: organization of the body; cells; tissues; membranes and glands; skeletal; muscular; nervous; sensory and endocrine systems.

Learner Outcomes: 

Upon completion of the course, students will have an understanding of the structural levels of body organization, of the gross and microscopic anatomy of the body system. Those students entering professional training in the health sciences will be at a level of competency required in that training.

 

The learning outcomes and competencies detailed in this course meet, or exceed the learning outcomes and competencies specified by the Kansas Core Outcomes Project for this course, as sanctioned by the Kansas Board of Regents.

Units of Outcomes and Criterion Based Evaluation Key for Core Content:

The following defines the minimum core content not including the final examination period. Instructors may add other content as time allows.

UNIT 1:  Chemistry and Cell Biology

Outcomes: Upon completion of this unit the student will gain an understanding of basic chemical concepts, cellular structures and functions.

  • Define the three major subatomic particles in terms of charge, mass and location.
  • Define and give examples of the major organic molecules in the body.
  • Describe the dehydration synthesis and hydrolysis processes that occur during polymer synthesis and decomposition.
  • Explain how hydrogen bonding leads to the unique properties of water in living systems.
  • Explain how molecules are formed by chemical bonding, including covalent and ionic bonding.
  • Distinguish between the phases of mitosis and the cell cycle.
  • Identify molecules as organic or inorganic.
  • Describe the importance of pH in living systems.
  • Identify cellular structures and explain their functions.
  • Explain the movement of molecules through the plasma membrane, including membrane structure, active and passive transport and tonicity.

UNIT 2:  Introduction to the Human Body: Structural Organization, Homeostasis, Anatomical Terminology

Outcomes: Upon completion of this unit the student will gain an understanding of the organization and terminology associated with the human body.

  • Define each of the following levels of structural organization: cellular, tissue, organ systems, and organism.
  • Identify the systems of the body and describe the basic function of each system.
  • Contrast a negative feedback system with a positive feedback system.
  • Describe the anatomical position.
  • Locate and name, using anatomical terminology, the body surface regions.
  • Describe the planes that divide the body.
  • Locate and name each abdominopelvic region.
  • List and define the boundaries of the body cavities.
  • List the organs or parts of organs locate in each body cavity.

 UNIT 3: Tissues

 Outcomes: Upon completion of this unit the student will gain an understanding of characteristics of the type of tissues.

  • Describe the features, locations, and functions of epithelium.
  • Describe the features, locations, and functions of connective tissues.
  • Describe the structural features and functions of nervous tissue.
  • Contrast the structural features, locations, and modes of control of the three types of muscle tissue.
  • Using prepared slides and a compound microscope; demonstrate the recognition of types of connective, epithelial, muscle and nerve tissues.
  • Distinguish between the types of membranes; mucous, serous and synovial.

UNIT 4: The Integumentary System

Outcomes: Upon completion of this unit the student will gain an understanding of the importance of the skin and its derivatives.

  • Describe the anatomy and physiology of the skin and its epidermal derivatives.
  • Compare the anatomy, distribution and physiology of hair, sebaceous, sudoriferous and ceruminous glands.
  • Explain the role of the skin in maintaining the homeostasis of normal body temperature.

UNIT 5:  The Skeletal System: Bone Formation, the Axial Skeleton, the Appendicular Skeleton, and Joints

Outcomes: Upon completion of this unit the student will gain an understanding of the structure and function of the skeleton.

  • Contrast the formation of endochondral and intramembranous bone.
  • Describe the role of bone in homeostasis.
  • Identify the parts of a long bone.
  • Identify the bones of the skull and the major markings associated with each.
  • Identify the principal sutures, fontanels, sinuses and foramina of the skull.
  • Identify the bones of the axial skeleton and their principal markings.
  • Identify the bones of the appendicular skeleton and their principal markings
  • Describe the classification of joints based on structure and movement.

UNIT 6:  The Muscular System

Outcomes: Upon completion of this unit the student will gain an understanding of the mechanism of muscle contraction and movement.

  • Identify to components of a skeletal muscle on the biochemical subcellular level.
  • Explain how the biochemical-subcellular muscle parts in gage to shorten a muscle (sliding filament model).
  • Sketch the graphical patterns of muscle contraction for twitch, summation, tetanus, fatigue and treppe.
  • Compare and contrast the role of isotonic and isometric contractions in body movements and positions.
  • Explain how muscles in a group interact to produce a basic body motion such as forearm flexion, leg extension.
  • Appraise the contribution of skeletal muscle in maintaining homeostasis.
  • Locate and identify on cadaver replicas, models and diagrams the principal skeletal muscles of the head, neck, trunk, and limbs.
  • Summarize the origins, insertions, actions and innervations of the principal head, neck, trunk and limb muscles.

UNIT 7:  The Nervous System

Outcomes: Upon completion of this unit the student will gain an understanding of the process of nervous system function and structure.

  • Classify the organs of the nervous system into central and peripheral divisions.
  • Describe the functions of neuroglia.
  • Describe the structure and functions of neurons.
  • Compare the basic types of ion channels and explain how they relate to action potentials.
  • Outline the series of steps for the development and implementation of an action potential.
  • Distinguish between spatial and temporal summation.
  • Describe the types of neuronal circuits in the nervous system.
  • Prepare a labeled diagram illustrating the initiation of an impulse in a presynaptic neuron and the transmission of the impulse across a synapse to a postsynaptic neuron.
  • Describe the protection, gross anatomical features and cross sectional structure of the spinal cord.
  • Describe the functions of the principal sensory and motor tracts of the spinal cord.
  • Describe the components of a reflex arc and its relationship to homeostasis.
  • List and describe three clinical important reflexes.
  • Describe the composition and coverings of a spinal nerve.
  • Describe how the brain is protected.
  • Explain the formation and circulation of cerebrospinal fluid.
  • Describe the blood supply to the brain and the concept of the blood-brain barrier.
  • Compare the structures and functions of the brain stem, diencephalon, cerebrum, and cerebellum.
  • List four neurotransmitters formed in the brain and give their functions.
  • Identify the twelve pairs of cranial nerves by name, number, type, location, and function.
  • Compare the structural and functional differences between the somatic and autonomic nervous systems.
  • Compare the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions.
  • Explain the relationship of the hypothalamus to the autonomic nervous systems.
  • Identify the structures of the special senses primarily the eye and ear.
  • Describe the neuronal pathways involved in each special sense; olfactory, gustatory, hearing, equilibrium, and vision.

UNIT 8: The Endocrine System

Outcomes: Upon completion of this unit the student will gain an understanding of the hormonal control systems of the body.

  • Describe the general functions of the endocrine system.
  • Compare the four chemical classes of hormones.
  • Describe the control of hormone secretions via feedback cycles.
  • Describe the anatomy and the hormones of the pituitary gland.
  • Relate the relationship of the hypothalamus to the anterior and posterior pituitary.
  • Identity, secretory control, & functional roles of the major hormones of the pituitary, adrenal, thyroid, parathyroid, pancreas, gonads & pineal glands, including the effects of hypo- & hyper secretion.
  • Predict the homeostatic malfunctions caused by imbalance in connection of (1) growth hormone, (2) ADH, (3) thyroid hormone, (4) calcitonin, (5 insulin, and (6) glucocorticoids.
  • Differentiate between the regions and hormones of the adrenal gland.
  • Outline the relationship of three hormones controlling blood glucose.

Projects Required:

None

Textbook:

Contact Bookstore for current textbook.

Materials/Equipment Required:

Compound microscopes.

Human skeletons - articulated and disarticulated of both human bone and plastic.

Prepared microscope slide of normal and pathological human tissues. Miscellaneous preserved cadaver material and models.

Attendance Policy:

Students should adhere to the attendance policy outlined by the instructor in the course syllabus.

Grading Policy:

The grading policy will be outlined by the instructor in the course syllabus.

Maximum class size:

Based on classroom occupancy

Course Timeframe: 

The U.S. Department of Education, Higher Learning Commission and the Kansas Board of Regents define credit hour and have specific regulations that the college must follow when developing, teaching and assessing the educational aspects of the college. A credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally-established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester hour of credit or an equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time. The number of semester hours of credit allowed for each distance education or blended hybrid courses shall be assigned by the college based on the amount of time needed to achieve the same course outcomes in a purely face-to-face format.

Refer to the following policies:

402.00 Academic Code of Conduct

263.00 Student Appeal of Course Grades

403.00 Student Code of Conduct

Disability Services Program:  

Cowley College, in recognition of state and federal laws, will accommodate a student with a documented disability.  If a student has a disability, which may impact work in this class which requires accommodations, contact the Disability Services Coordinator.