Feb 24, 2020  
2019 - 2020 Cowley College Academic Catalog 
    
2019 - 2020 Cowley College Academic Catalog

ALH5202 CERTIFIED MEDICATION AIDE COURSE PROCEDURE


ALH5202 CERTIFIED MEDICATION AIDE

4 Credit Hours

Student Level:

This course is open to students on the college level in either the freshman or sophomore year.

Catalog Description:

ALH5202 - Certified Medication Aide (4 hrs)

Upon completion of this 75-hour course, the student will receive the opportunity to take an exam, under KDHE guidelines. Upon successfully passing the course and the state exam, the student will receive certification for Medication Aide. This course will contain 50 clock theory hours and 25 clock clinical hours. The course will cover the role and responsibilities of the Medication Aide, drugs used by the system, and administration of medications.

Course Classification:

Lecture/Lab Combo

Prerequisites:

Student must hold a Kansas Certified Nurse Aide (CNA) certificate and meet or exceed minimum reading standards of eighth grade level. Students must be 18 years of age to enroll, per KDADS requirement.

At the start of the course, each student will be required to have a background check completed.

Controlling Purpose:

This course is designed to help the student increase their knowledge concerning geriatric care, medication use and administration.  The student will be able to demonstrate basic medication administration and understanding of significant side effects, following the five rights of medication administration.

Learner Outcomes:

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to understand the role of the Medication Aide, and have the knowledge and skills necessary to become a Medication Aide.

Units Outcomes and Criterion Based Evaluation:

The following defines the minimum core content not including the final examination period. Instructors may add other content as time allows:

UNIT I:  Legal, Ethical and Current Practice

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of the role responsibilities, and regulations of CMAs in healthcare.

  • Understand the role and responsibilities of the medication aide.
  • Identify statutes and regulations relating to CMA practice.
  • Practice ethical standards of conduct.

UNIT II:  Basic Communication Skills

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of communication skills used by CMAs.

  • Describe the communication process.
  • Describe the importance of verbal and nonverbal communication in health care.
  • Identify barriers to effective communication.
  • Report significant changes in resident’s condition and in a timely manner.
  • Share information objectively and subjectively in a professional manner.
  • Participate in the nursing process.
  • Show sensitivity to residents’ verbal and nonverbal communications, changes in thought process, mood and behavior.
  • Recognize when, where and how to refer resident to other professionals.
  • Identify important elements of an effective helping relationship.
  • Use techniques which support the care plan including:  behavior modification, therapeutic communication, reality orientation, and validation.
  • Relate effectively with other team members.

UNIT III:  Infection Control

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of infection control to prevent possible harm to residents, family members, and staff.

  • Identify and exhibit ways to prevent the transfer of infection.

UNIT IV:  Safety and Medication Administration - Pharmacodynamics

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of safe medication administration guidelines.

  • Define pharmacokinetics.
  • Define medications action.
  • Explain the relationship between medications and drugs.
  • State the four basic medication actions.
  • Name and describe the four body processes that affect medication action.
  • Identify factors influencing medication action and identify their effects.
  • Define medications effects.
  • State the difference between therapeutic effects and side effects.
  • Differentiate between local and systemic effects.
  • Recognize descriptions of major adverse reactions.
  • Identify the meaning for the terms which describe unwanted medications reactions.
  • Differentiate between synergism and antagonism.
  • Explain the difference between psychological and physical medications dependence.
  • Name classifications of drugs that are commonly abused.

UNIT V:  Safety and Drug Administration - Forms of Medications

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of the various forms of medication and how they are administered per physician’s orders.

  • Identify forms in which medications are available and implications for effective use.
  • Tell how lotions, liniments and ointments should be applied.
  • State the correct procedures for storing and using tinctures, fluidextracts, elixirs, spirits and suspensions.
  • Explain what delayed-release tablets and capsules are and how they should be given to residents.
  • State the rules for giving enteric-coated tablets and capsules.
  • List and describe the routes for administering medications.
  • Explain who is qualified to give medications by the parenteral route.

UNIT VI:  Safety and Drug Administration - Common Medical Abbreviations

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of common medical abbreviations and their proper usage to facilitate communication.

  • Give the meanings of and use common medical abbreviations for medications forms, route administration times and general medical abbreviations.

UNIT VII:  Safety and Drug Administration - Mathematics, Weights and Measures

Outcomes Students will demonstrate knowledge of formulas used to insure safe medication administration and dosing.

  • Identify what professionals are responsible for calculating drug dosages.
  • Identify the importance of correct dose measurement.
  • Correctly read and write lower case Roman numerals ½ through 30.
  • Define the prefixes used in the Metric system.
  • Add and subtract decimals.
  • Describe the disadvantages of the Household system of measurement in medication use.
  • List two drugs that are measures in units.
  • Convert grams to milligrams and visa versa.
  • List some of the most common equivalents among the different systems of measurement.
  • Add fractions and decimals.

UNIT VIII:  Safety and Drug Administration - Drug Standards and Names

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of drug standards and difference in drug names.

  • Define drug standards and tell how they are determined.
  • Explain why drug standards are necessary.
  • Identify the meaning of “U.S.P.” following a drug name.
  • List and describe two types of names by which drugs are known.
  • Differentiate between generic and brand names for drugs.

UNIT IX:  Safety and Drug Administration - Drug Resources Information

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of drug information and resources.

  • Identify names of resources for drug information.
  • Use drug resources to obtain drug information.

UNIT X:  Drugs and Body Systems

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of drugs and their affects on the systems of the human body.

  • Identify the basic structures and functions of the cardiovascular system.
  • Recognize anatomical landmarks.
  • Explain the difference between normal and abnormal cardiovascular functioning.
  • Identify the names of instruments used to measure blood pressure and to record the heart rate.
  • List the average blood pressure and heart rate.
  • Identify the main components of blood.
  • State the functions of the lymphatic system.
  • State the proper medical terms of the general signs and symptoms of cardiovascular disorders.
  • Explain the major disorders for which cardiovascular drugs are given.
  • Describe the actions, give examples, nursing care and side effects for these drug groups:  vasodilators (anti-anginal); diuretics; antihypertensives; calcium channel blockers; cardiac stimulants (cardiac glycosides, digitalis); antilipemics; antiarrhythmics; anticoagulants; coagulants; hemantinics.
  • Identify specific resident safety concerns and nursing interventions for the drug groups listed above.
  • Explain how the correct procedures for giving sublingual and oral medications to patients with cardiovascular disorders.
  • Explain what information regarding the resident’s refusal to take antihypertensive medication should be communicated to the nurse in charge.
  • Explain the difference between an initial dose, a digitalizing dose and a maintenance dose of digoxin.
  • Describe the symptoms in the resident taking digitalis drugs for which you would see guidance from the supervisor.
  • Describe the symptoms in the resident taking oral anticoagulant drugs for which you would seek guidance from the supervisor.
  • Identify measures which help prevent or detect complications from anticoagulant therapy.

UNIT XI:  Drugs and Body Systems - Urinary System

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of the urinary system, the diseases of that system, and the drugs and treatments given by the CMA for the treatment of that system.

  • Identify basic structures and functions of the urinary system.
  • State the three functions of the urinary system.
  • Define the key terms for the urinary system, especially:
  • Anuria; catheter; dysuria; hematuria; incontinence; nephritis; pH; pyuria
  • Explain how changes in the urine give clues to disorders in the urinary system.
  • Define the symptoms of urinary system disorders and fluid imbalances.
  • Describe the major urinary system disorders.
  • Describe the causes of dehydration and its treatment.
  • Describe the following drug groups or treatments by giving examples of common medications or treatments and their actions, and listing nursing care and side effects associated with that type of drug/treatment:  antispasmodics; antibiotics; urinary antiseptics; urinary analgesics; diuretics; replacements electrolytes (potassium, calcium, etc.)
  • Identify drugs used to treat urinary tract disorders and nursing measures to promote effectiveness.
  • State the purposes of a urinary catheter.
  • Identify nursing actions to monitor a diuretic’s actions, to observe for complications and promote comfort for the resident. 
  • Identify the reason that potassium replacement drugs are used with diuretics.
  • Identify nursing actions to prevent medications reactions.

UNIT XII:  Drugs and Body Systems - Respiratory System

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of the respiratory system, the diseases of that system, and the drugs and treatments given by the CMA for the treatment of that system.

  • Identify the major structures and functions of the respiratory system.
  • Describe the mechanisms of breathing.
  • Explain how gases are exchanged in the lungs.
  • List the normal respiratory rate.
  • Describe the major respiratory disorders.
  • List and describe common signs and symptoms of respiratory disorders using correct medical terms.
  • Describe the actions, give examples, nursing care and side effects for these drug groups: antihistamines, decongestants, and bronchodilators.
  • Explain and exhibit how to administer medication through a meter dose inhaler.
  • Explain and show how to administer medication using a nasal inhaler.

UNIT XIV:  Drugs and Body Systems - Nervous System

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of the nervous system, the diseases of that system, and the drugs and treatments given by the CMA for the treatment of that system.

  • Identify the two major divisions of the nervous system.
  • Describe the common structures associated with these divisions.
  • Use the appropriate terms associated with signs of nervous system disorders.
  • Describe disorders of the nervous system, especially those associated with aging:  Parkinson’s disease, myasthenia gravis, multiple sclerosis, drug induced movement disorders, seizure disorders, stroke, tumors, inflammation and infections.
  • Identify related medications and treatments for disorders of the nervous system.
  • Discuss implications for nursing care and side effects of medications associated with major nervous system disorders.
  • Describe the actions and give examples of the following drug groups:  CNS cerebral stimulants, respiratory stimulants, CNS depressants, narcotic and non-narcotic analgesics, antidepressants sedative/hypnotics, anti-psychotics, anti-manic psychotherapeutic, and anti-Parkinson’s disease drugs.
  • Identify drugs that are often involved in drug abuse.
  • Describe general nursing care when giving medications for the nervous system.
  • List medications which may result in transient or permanent drug-induced movement disorders.
  • Describe several mental conditions for which psychotropic medications may be given as treatment.
  • List medications which may result in a high potential for the resident to fall.
  • Define pain.
  • Describe the advantage of scheduled pain medication versus PRN medication for chronic pain control.
  • Define placebo.  Discuss the ethical issues associated with using placebos.

UNIT XV:  Drugs and Body Systems - Drugs Affecting the Special Senses: Eye

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of the eye, the diseases of the eye, and the drugs and treatments given by the CMA for the treatment of eyes.

  • Identify basic structures and functions of the eye, terms and abbreviations referring to the eye.
  • Describe the mechanisms of sight.
  • Describe the effects of aging on the structures of vision.
  • Identify major disorders of the eyes and vision.
  • List terms and abbreviations associated with providing medications to the eyes.
  • Describe the proper procedures for administering eye drops and ointments.
  • Identify measures which help ensure safety for the resident with glaucoma.
  • Identify the name and actions of drugs used to treat glaucoma.
  • Identify reasons why anti-infective drugs may be used in the eye and give some examples of drugs used.
  • Identify actions, uses and names for eye lubricants.

UNIT XVI:  Drugs and Body Systems - Drugs Affecting the Special Senses:  Ear 

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of the ear, the diseases of the ear, and the drugs and treatments given by the CMA for the treatment of ears.

  • Identify major structures of the ear and their functions.
  • Describe the effects of aging on auditory structures and functions.
  • Describe the major disorders of the ear for which medications are given.
  • Describe the actions and give examples of nursing care and side effects of these drug groups for disorders affecting the ear:  antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, vasoconstrictives, antihistamines, analgesics, and ear wax softeners.
  • Describe the methods/steps/proper procedure for correctly administering ear medication.

UNIT XVII:  Drugs and Body Systems - Musculoskeletal System

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of the musculoskeletal system, the diseases of that system, and the drugs and treatments given by the CMA for the treatment of that system.

  • Identify the major structures, functions of the musculoskeletal system.
  • Identify the major disorders that affect the musculoskeletal system, especially associated with aging.
  • Explain the difference between gout, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Discuss malfunctions of bone marrow and their effects on the blood.
  • Name related medications, their actions, uses, side effects and implications in treatment of musculoskeletal disorders.
  • Describe the usual care of residents with musculoskeletal disorders, especially as it relates to medication administration.

UNIT XVIII:    Drugs and Body Systems - Endocrine System

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of the endocrine system, the diseases of that system, and the drugs and treatments given by the CMA for the treatment of that system.

  • Identify the major structures and functions of the endocrine system.
  • Describe the regulatory mechanisms of the endocrine system.
  • Illustrate why disorders may be prefixed with “hypo” or “hyper.”  Give examples of disorders of the endocrine system named in the manner.
  • Give examples of drugs used for hormone replacement therapy for thyroid diseases, pituitary disorders, and diabetes.
  • Use correct medical terms when referring to parts of the endocrine system and symptoms of hormone imbalances.
  • Describe how the body malfunctions in diabetes and what changes occur in the urine of an untreated diabetic.
  • State what factors influence the diabetic resident’s insulin needs.
  • Identify diet, activity and medication as treatments of diabetes.
  • List the kinds of insulin available for treatment of diabetes mellitus.
  • Recognize the symptoms of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia and explain how they are treated.
  • Give examples of oral hypoglycemics used for diabetes treatment and explain how they work.
  • State names, action, side effects of oral hypoglycemia agents.
  • Explain why diabetics must have frequent blood tests.
  • State the actions of glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids and give examples of each.
  • List at least three uses of corticosteroids.
  • List at least five possible side effects of long-term corticosteroid therapy.

UNIT XVIII:    Drugs and Body Systems - Endocrine System

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of the endocrine system, the diseases of that system, and the drugs and treatments given by the CMA for the treatment of that system.

  • Identify the major structures and functions of the endocrine system.
  • Describe the regulatory mechanisms of the endocrine system.
  • Illustrate why disorders may be prefixed with “hypo” or “hyper.”  Give examples of disorders of the endocrine system named in the manner.
  • Give examples of drugs used for hormone replacement therapy for thyroid diseases, pituitary disorders, and diabetes.
  • Use correct medical terms when referring to parts of the endocrine system and symptoms of hormone imbalances.
  • Describe how the body malfunctions in diabetes and what changes occur in the urine of an untreated diabetic.
  • State what factors influence the diabetic resident’s insulin needs.
  • Identify diet, activity and medication as treatments of diabetes.
  • List the kinds of insulin available for treatment of diabetes mellitus.
  • Recognize the symptoms of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia and explain how they are treated.
  • Give examples of oral hypoglycemics used for diabetes treatment and explain how they work.
  • State names, action, side effects of oral hypoglycemia agents.
  • Explain why diabetics must have frequent blood tests.
  • State the actions of glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids and give examples of each.
  • List at least three uses of corticosteroids.
  • List at least five possible side effects of long-term corticosteroid therapy.

UNIT XIX:  Drugs and Body Systems - Reproductive System

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of the reproductive system, the diseases of that system, and the drugs and treatments given by the CMA for the treatment of that system.

  • Name the main parts of the male and the female internal and external genitalial.
  • Use correct medical terms to describe the parts, functions, and disorders of the reproductive system.
  • Name the hormones produced by the male and female gonads and tell what they do.
  • Describe the actions of gonadotropins, oxytocin, and prolactin.
  • Recognize descriptions of the major disorders that affect the reproductive system.
  • List the main uses of hormones in drug therapy.
  • State the major side effects of sex hormone therapy.
  • State action, side effects and names of male and female hormones used as medication.

UNIT XX:  Drugs and Body Systems - Integumentary System

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of the integumentary system, the diseases of that system, and the drugs and treatments given by the CMA for the treatment of that system.

  • Identify three layers of skin, their location, structure, and other structures located within the skin.
  • Describe the major functions of the skin.
  • Identify common changes in the integumentary system associated with aging.
  • Describe major disorders affecting the skin.
  • Identify non drug measures to help treat skin disorders.
  • Identify general issues for skin and skin care, specific types of dressing and methods of administering skin medications.

UNIT XXI:  Drugs and Body Systems - Anti-Infective Agents

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of anti-infective agents and their usage and administration methods.

  • Identify cause, control measures, signs and symptoms of infection.
  • Describe methods of reducing infection.
  • Discuss how aging contributes to increased risk for infection(s).
  • Identify terms describing topical anti-infective agents.
  • Name topical anti-infective agents and actions.
  • Identify terms describing systemic anti-infective agents.
  • Recognize some of the common drugs, nursing care and side effects in following groups:  penicillins; cephalosporins; sulfonamides; sluoroquinolones; tetracycline; aminoglycosides; macrolide, lincomycin, and clindamycin, vancomycin; metronidazole; antiviral; antifungal
  • Demonstrate methods of identifying action, use, side effects, adverse reactions, interactions with food or other drugs, contraindications, and special nursing care which should be considered in giving medications.
  • Describe what actions the medication aide should take in administering medication which may result in changes in laboratory results or which place a resident at particular risk for:  bleeding, heart rate changes, breathing difficulties, and/or gastrointestinal upset.
  • Name signs or symptoms of a medication sensitivity reaction.
  • Describe methods of preventing medication sensitivity reaction.
  • Name the most severe form of medication sensitivity reaction and how the medication aide should respond in the event a resident has this type of reaction.

UNIT XXII:  Drugs and Body Systems - Vitamins, Minerals and Herbs

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of vitamins, minerals, and herbs and their usage and administration methods.

  • Identify the major food groups from the Food Guide Pyramid.
  • State what general functions vitamins have in the body.
  • Discuss situations when vitamins may be used.
  • Give some examples of vitamins.
  • Discuss the general differences among:  fat-soluble and water-soluble vitamins, macrominerals, and microminerals.
  • Identify resources for adult Recommended Daily Allowances for the major vitamins and minerals.
  • Identify the actions and give examples of iron preparations.
  • State the measures to use when administering iron to minimize side effects.
  • Identify the action and give an example of calcium medication.
  • Identify the action and give examples of potassium medications.
  • Give examples of alternatives to traditional pharmacological interventions.
  • Describe common herbal and food supplements and their uses.
  • Explain some of the adverse effects which herbal remedies can produce.

UNIT XXIII:  Administration of Medications - Preparing to Administer Medications

Outcomes:  Student will demonstrate knowledge and skill in how medications and treatments are administered to residents in the long term care facility.

  • Identify ways in which drugs are supplied to the nursing home.
  • Describe unit dose and multiple dose packaging of drugs.
  • Explain proper storage of medicines in the medication room, medication cart and resident’s bedroom.
  • Describe proper methods to store equipment and supplies related to the administration of medications.
  • Describe a method to verify medications orders.
  • Explain the responsibility of the medication aide in questioning medication orders, including what to do if the order is not clear or legible.
  • Discuss methods for ordering drugs from the pharmacy.
  • Identify the basic components of a medication order.
  • Transcribe orders from the ordering practitioner for medications/treatments under the supervision of a licensed nurse.
  • List times on the clock using “military time.”
  • Communicate medications administered and the resident’s responses to medications to the licenses nurse.
  • Explain how a Kardex, medication cards, and a Medication Administration Record (MAR) are used to communicate medication orders.  Demonstrate how to document administration of a medication.
  • Explain how controlled substances can be accounted for at the beginning of each shift and why this is done.  Note:  this is subject to each facility’s own policy and procedure for controlled substances.
  • Identify and demonstrate specific techniques to administer medications using the “Five Rights” of medications administration including techniques for specific forms of medications.
  • Identify and demonstrate ways to prevent the transfer of infections.
  • List ways to identify the resident.
  • Identify potential sources for errors.
  • Identify drugs which may require special controls or record keeping, and name the controls which are used.

UNIT XXIV:  Administration of Medications - Recording Medication Administration

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate proper documentation of medications given in the lab and practice settings.

  • Identify general guidelines to follow in recording medication administration.
  • Describe the content of a resident’s clinical record.
  • Document accurately activities related to administration of medications and treatment.
  • Describe the principles of clinical documentation.
  • Correct an error in a resident’s clinical record.
  • Describe how to document a medication that was not administered, held, or refused.
  • Identify appropriate documentation procedures when medication is given at times other than when regularly scheduled.
  • Show the process for correcting an error in documentation.
  • Show the process for documenting a late entry in a clinical record.
  • Discuss why it is important to follow federal/state laws/regulations and facility policy when documenting in a resident’s record.
  • Record resident’s response to medication.
  • Report medication errors immediately to the license nurse supervisor.

UNIT XXV:  Administration of Medications - Administering Medications to the Elderly

Outcomes:  Student will demonstrate understanding of how medications are administered to elderly people and how their medication administration techniques are important in the delivery of care.

  • Describe the major changes that take place in the various body systems during aging.
  • State why treatment of elderly residents must be individualized according to each person’s needs.
  • Describe the effects of aging on absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of drugs.
  • Explain how medication orders are usually adjusted to take into account the pharmacokinetics of the older resident.
  • Explain why the presence of more diseases in old age makes drug therapy more complicated.
  • State what types of adverse reactions health care workers must look for in administering drugs to the aged.
  • Explain how elderly residents are affected by the attitudes and actions of health care workers.
  • Review safe medication administration practices and the principles that are specific for the elderly resident.
  • Explain how you can over come the difficulties of administering medications to the elderly.
  • List ways in which residents can take an active part in their own medication therapy.
  • Identify and demonstrate methods of safe and effective drug administration by the following routes:  oral; inhaler; nebulizer; rectal; vaginal; eye; ear; skin.
  • Show the use of standard precautions when administering medications.
  • Correctly use military time.
  • Correctly identify, use and write abbreviations for medication forms, routes, administration times and general medical abbreviations.

Projects Required:

None

Textbook:

Contact Bookstore for current textbook.

Reference Materials:

“Kansas Certified Medication Aide Curriculum Guidelines” by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment.

Attendance Policy:

Students should adhere to the attendance policy outlined by the instructor in the course syllabus.

Grading Policy:

The grading policy will be outlined by the instructor in the course syllabus.

Maximum class size:

Based on classroom occupancy

Course Time Frame:

The U.S. Department of Education, Higher Learning Commission and the Kansas Board of Regents define credit hour and have specific regulations that the college must follow when developing, teaching and assessing the educational aspects of the college.  A credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally-established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester hour of credit or an equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time.  The number of semester hours of credit allowed for each distance education or blended hybrid courses shall be assigned by the college based on the amount of time needed to achieve the same course outcomes in a purely face-to-face format.

Refer to the following policies:

402.00 Academic Code of Conduct

263.00 Student Appeal of Course Grades

403.00 Student Code of Conduct

Disability Services Program: 

Cowley College, in recognition of state and federal laws, will accommodate a student with a documented disability.  If a student has a disability which may impact work in this class and which requires accommodations, contact the Disability Services Coordinator.