Feb 21, 2020  
2019 - 2020 Cowley College Academic Catalog 
    
2019 - 2020 Cowley College Academic Catalog

LED1462  DIVERSITY ISSUES IN LEADERSHIP COURSE PROCEDURE


LED1462  DIVERSITY ISSUES IN LEADERSHIP

3 Credit Hours

Student Level:

This course is open to students on the college level in either the freshman or sophomore year.

Catalog Description:
LED1462 - Diversity Issues In Leadership (3 hrs)

This course is designed to help the student increase knowledge concerning diversity issues in the workplace. Emphasis is placed on making diversity in organizations a positive attribute, dispelling myths and misperceptions about diversity issues, and databased research about diversity. Participants will establish a solid perspective on the various aspects of organizational diversity, including why diversity is important for organizations, recruiting, retaining, and effectively and fairly utilizing a diverse workforce, and legislation related to diversity. Upon completion of the course, the student will have a greater understanding of diversity and how to make it a positive force in his/her existence. Students will build in-depth knowledge of key racial/ethnic groups, sex and gender, religion, work and family, weight and appearance, physical and mental ability, and sexual orientation. Students will also learn how to become a diversity-friendly employer, include workers often devalued, and how both dominant and non-dominant group members can work to effect change.

Course Classification:

Lecture

Prerequisites:

None

Controlling Purpose:

This course is designed to help the student increase their knowledge concerning diversity issues in the workplace.  Emphasis is placed on making diversity in organizations a positive attribute, dispelling myths and misperceptions about diversity issues, and data-based research about diversity.  Participants will establish a solid perspective on the various aspects of organizational diversity, including why diversity is important for organizations, recruiting, retaining, and effectively and fairly utilizing a diverse workforce, and legislation related to diversity.

Learner Outcomes:

Upon completion of the course, the student will have a greater understanding of diversity and how to make it a positive force in his/her existence.  Students will build in-depth knowledge of key racial/ethnic groups, sex and gender, religion, work and family, weight and appearance, physical and mental ability, and sexual orientation. Students will also learn how to become a diversity-friendly employer, include workers often devalued, and how both dominant and non-dominant group members can work to effect change.

UNIT 1: Introduction, Legislation, and Theories

Outcomes:  The student will gain an understanding of common issues in diversity.

  • Explain recent and projected changes in the demographics makeup of the U.S. population.
  • Explain what “diversity” encompasses.
  • Discuss research supportive of the individual and organizational benefits of diversity.
  • Understand the rationale and structure behind the organization of the book.
  • Explain the historical background of and rationale behind specific diversity-related legislation
  • Describe components and limitations of such legislation and understand why legislation alone is an insufficient incentive to cause organizations to value diversity.
  • Discuss events in several egregious diversity-related lawsuits against companies in the U.S. and speculate one reason for the persistence of discrimination.
  • Consider reasons that companies may be charged with, and found liable for discriminatory acts, even though discrimination is at odds with the company’s stated policies and beliefs.
  • Discuss ways to minimize the likelihood of discrimination and maximize the benefits of diversity in organizations.
  • Speculate on what other laws may be passed in the future.
  • Examine the meaning of the terms minority group and nondominant group.
  • Understand characteristics used to identify minority groups and be able to use these characteristics to identify the nondominant groups in one’s particular environment,
  • Discuss the thought processes related to stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination.
  • Understand in-group favoritism and out-group bias and how they disadvantage nondominant group members and impede diversity efforts.
  • Understand ways to avoid automatic stereotyping.
  • Have a better foundation for synthesizing the material in the remaining chapters.

UNIT 2:  Examining Specific Groups and Categories:  African Americans & Latinos/Hispanics

Outcomes: The student will gain an awareness of diversity issues in relation to specific groups.

  • Show awareness of the historical background and current status of African Americans in the U.S.
  • Discuss participation rates, employment, and income levels of African Americans in the U.S.
  • Examine racial differences in educational return on investment for African Americans and other racial and ethnic groups.
  • Understand research evidence of access and treatment discrimination experienced by African Americans.
  • Discuss similarities and differences between employment experiences of African American men and women.
  • Understand individual and organizational measures that can be used to improve organizational experiences of African Americans.
  • Understand the historical background and current status of Hispanics in the U.S.
  • Understand the effects of higher population growth rates among Hispanics on diversity issues.
  • Examine diversity in education, participation rates, employment, and income levels among Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Mexican Hispanics in the U.S.
  • Discuss employment experiences of Hispanics, focusing on those of Latinos, immigrants, and managers and professionals.
  • Examine the experiences of Hispanics with police misconduct and racial profiling.
  • Discuss aspects of the growing Latino consumer market.
  • Understand individual and organizational measures that can be used to improve organizational experiences of Hispanics.

UNIT 3:  Examining Specific Groups and Categories: Asian Americans, White/European Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Multiracial Group Members

Outcomes: The student will gain an awareness of diversity issues in relation to specific groups.

  • Exhibit increased awareness of the history of and diversity among Asians in the U.S.
  • Discuss participation rates, employment, and income levels of Asians.
  • Examine differences in educational return on investment for Asians when compared with other groups.
  • Show awareness of research regarding Asians’ attitudes toward affirmative action and their experiences with the glass ceiling and with individual and organizational discrimination
  • Understand the “model minority myth” and similarities and differences among Asian Americans and between Asians and other minority groups.
  • Show an awareness of the historical background of White ethnic groups in the U.S.
  • Discuss participation rates, employment, and income levels of White men and women.
  • Examine racial differences in educational return on investment for Whites and other racial and ethnic groups.
  • Discuss similarities and differences between employment experiences of White men and women
  • Discuss the fluidity in groups deemed “White” in the U.S. and aspects of “White privilege” and the “myth of meritocracy”.
  • Understand individual and organizational measures that can be employed to include Whites in the study of diversity and to obtain their commitment to diversity in organizations.
  • Show awareness of the historical background and current status of American Indians, Alaskan Natives, and multiracial group members in the U.S.
  • Discuss education, participation rates, employment, and income levels of American Indians and Alaska Natives in the U.S.
  • Understand the diversity among multiracial group members and issues unique to them.
  • Understand legislation related to employment experiences of American Indians, Alaska Natives, and multiracial group members.
  • Make recommendations for inclusion of these groups in diversity efforts.

UNIT 4:  Examining Specific Groups and Categories: Sex and Gender, Religion, Sexual Orientation

Outcomes: The student will gain an awareness of diversity issues in relation to specific groups.

  • Explain differences in women’s and men’s participation rates, employment, and income levels.
  • Discuss the role of gender role socialization in men’s and women’s occupational choices and opportunities.
  • Explain the effects of sex segregation, sex discrimination, and sexual harassment on women’s careers and discuss selected cases related to them.
  • Discuss similarities and differences between employment experiences of White women and women of color and White men and women of color
  • Understand the role of negotiation in male/female salary differences and feminization of poverty as diversity concerns.
  • Discuss methods that can be used to improve organizational cultures for gender equity.
  • Understand the history of religious diversity in the U.S.
  • Discuss legislation related to religious diversity and selected EEOC cases involving religious discrimination.
  • Understand relationships between religious organizations and gender diversity among organizational leaders.
  • Discuss ways in which employers can accommodate religious practices of employees and applicants.
  • Examine ways employers may deal with conflict among employees’ different religious beliefs.
  • Establish an awareness of the experience of sexual minorities in organizations, in particular, gays and lesbians.
  • Show awareness of similarities and differences between sexual minorities and other nondominant groups.
  • Consider population estimates, education, and income levels of gays and lesbians compared with heterosexual men and women.
  • Examine misperceptions about sexual minorities at work, negative outcomes associated with being closeted, and benefits of full inclusion of sexual minorities.
  • Understand individual and organizational measures that can be employed to include sexual minorities as valued employees, customers, and constituents.

UNIT 5: Examining Different Groups and Categories: Age, Physical and Mental Ability, Work and Family, Weight and Appearance

Outcomes: The student will gain an awareness of diversity issues in relation to specific groups.

  • Understand the age distribution and explain what effects recent and projected shifts in this distribution will have on diversity concerns.
  • Define ageism and discuss its meaning for older and younger workers.
  • Explain why younger workers as well as older workers should be included in conceptualizations of age as an aspect of diversity.
  • Discuss misperceptions about the performance and abilities of older and younger workers
  • Explain age-related legislation and discuss selected cases of employment discrimination against older and younger workers.
  • Discuss the effects of discrimination and harassment on young workers and the goals of the EECO’s Youth @ Work initiative.
  • Discuss the proportion of people who have disabilities in the U.S.
  • Explain purposes of and provisions of the Rehabilitation and Americans with Disabilities Acts.
  • Discuss earnings and employment experiences of people with disabilities.
  • Compare perceptions about people with disabilities with their actual work performance.
  • Describe selected cases involving disability discrimination.
  • Propose reasonable accommodations to enable people with selected impairments to work.
  • Discuss the meanings of family in the U.S. and discuss legislation and litigation related to work and family.
  • Explain changes in workforce participation rates for women with children; compare parental policies with those in selected other countries.
  • Examine effects of having children on career progress of men and women; explain why family issues, including low wages, child care, and “the second shift” are relevant to employers and to families.
  • Discuss effects of employer child and elder care assistance on employee satisfaction and turnover.
  • Explore measures organizations may implement to assist employees to cope with work and family issues.
  • Discuss increasing weight levels in the U.S. and other populations around the world.
  • Understand the U.S. legislation relevant to weight and appearance discrimination.
  • Describe employment experiences of overweight people and gender differences in employment outcomes based on weight and appearance.
  • Explain how weight and appearance are relevant aspects of diversity and consider whether the obese should be a protected class.
  • Discuss legitimate health issues consequences of obesity and employers’ concerns about increased health care and other costs associated with obesity.
  • Discuss how seemingly legitimate appearance requirements may result in illegal discrimination.
  • Develop methods that can be used to increase acceptance of people of varying dimensions, with or without the presence of widespread legislation.

UNIT 6:  Global Vision

Outcomes:  The student will gain an understanding of how diversity issues are relevant to organizations in countries around the world.

  • Understand the issues of dominant and nondominant groups and the need for equity and fairness as key to diversity around the world.
  • Discuss inequity on the basis of sex and gender, disability, sexual orientation, poverty as common diversity concerns in many countries.
  • Understand how to analyze historical and current factors to help identify and assess the specific diversity issues in a country.
  • Make specific recommendations for individuals, organizations, and society for fostering diversity.
  • Understand why the diversity of the U.S. population, the globalization of the world, and increased competitiveness make attending to diversity in the U.S. and including the contribution of its entire population imperative, rather than optional.

Projects Required:

Projects may vary according to the instructor.

Textbook:

Contact Bookstore for current textbook.

Materials/Equipment Required:

Computer and Printer

Internet access

Attendance Policy:

Students should adhere to the attendance policy outlined by the instructor in the course syllabus.

Grading Policy:

The grading policy will be outlined by the instructor in the course syllabus.

Maximum class size:

Based on classroom occupancy

Course Timeframe:

The U.S. Department of Education, Higher Learning Commission and the Kansas Board of Regents define credit hour and have specific regulations that the college must follow when developing, teaching and assessing the educational aspects of the college. A credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally-established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester hour of credit or an equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time. The number of semester hours of credit allowed for each distance education or blended hybrid courses shall be assigned by the college based on the amount of time needed to achieve the same course outcomes in a purely face-to-face format.

Refer to the following policies:

402.00 Academic Code of Conduct

263.00 Student Appeal of Course Grades

403.00 Student Code of Conduct

Disability Services Program: 

Cowley College, in recognition of state and federal laws, will accommodate a student with a documented disability. If a student has a disability which may impact work in this class which requires accommodations, contact the Disability Services Coordinator.